Zinc: Why You Might Consider It for IV Therapy in Toronto

If you want to promote healing for damaged tissues or recharge your immune function, zinc IV therapy from Toronto could offer support.

As an essential mineral, zinc makes quite a statement on the human body. For instance, did you know that this  mineral is a cofactor for over 300 enzymes in the body? Countless research has shown that zinc can provide healthy advantages, which includes supporting your eyes, skin, cardiovascular health, and more. We can’t deny that this multi-talented mineral is vital for optimal functioning.

Zinc is one supplement we frequently suggest to patients for replenishing this nutrient level. So, how does it aid the body? And how can you take it? The Toronto Functional Medicine Centre explains how IV therapy and other treatment routes with zinc might help relieve mineral deficiencies, promote skin healing, and more.

Facts to know about this supplement

Due to its beneficial effects, it could assist some with achieving health goals or optimal health. The rewards for taking it might include the following:

  • Helps with alleviating/preventing nutritional deficiencies: When you’re lacking this mineral, it “…can present with growth impairment, sexual dysfunction, inflammation, gastrointestinal symptoms, or cutaneous involvement,” confirms StatPearls. Supplementing regularly might circumvent some health issues down the road.
  • Could reduce the duration of seasonal infections, such as the common cold: In a study in 2017 on children, those who were given the supplement had a short period of congestion and runny nose. “Based on the results of this study and other similar studies, zinc sulfate has positive effects on children with colds,” confirmed a Jundishapur Journal of Chronic Disease Care article.
  • Could possibly help clear acne: The supplement has been studied as an alternative therapy to antibiotics for acne vulgaris. In one 2021 study, participants who were taking it experienced substantial improvements compared to others who were given an antibiotic.
  • Might delay age-related macular degeneration (AMD): According to Healthline, “One 2014 study in 72 people with AMD showed that taking 50 mg of zinc sulfate daily for 3 months slowed the progression of the disease.” More research is necessary though to understand the specific link between this supplement and eye health.

How to take this essential supplement

If you’re interested in this nutrient, a functional medicine practitioner should be consulted. Excessive amounts of zinc in the body can cause an upset stomach; it could also interact with medications, such as antibiotics. And if taken over a long period of time, it could diminish your copper levels. But under the supervision of a health care provider, you can get insight on personal dosages and contraindications.

This beneficial nutrient can be administered in these ways:

  • Oral supplements: Tablets or capsules are available in stores. Take note: it could aggravate your stomach as a side effect. The supplement should be consumed with food and not taken at the same time as calcium and iron supplements. If you suffer from dysphagia or malabsorption, we may advise liquid versions.
  • IV nutrient therapy: This supplement can be infused as one of your key ingredients for intravenous therapy. IV treatments with essential nutrients bypass the digestive tract; as a result, your absorption rate increases and you might not experience unwanted side effects that tend to result from oral supplements.

Food Sources of Zinc:
If you want to increase this mineral in your body, eat these zinc-containing items:
– Meat
– Seafood
– Whole Grains
– Beans
– Eggs and dairy
– Nuts

FYI: zinc intravenous drips are available at our clinic. We carry other beneficial ingredients, too, such as high-dose vitamin C, amino acids, Myers Cocktail, glutamic acid, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ IV therapy), major antioxidants, and other essential vitamins and minerals for IV therapy drips.

About our IV vitamin therapy drips and functional medicine treatments

Intravenous infusion therapy (IV therapy) naturally promotes blood cell production and cellular energy, while fighting oxidative stress. At the Toronto Functional Medicine Centre, IV vitamin drip treatments are compounded daily. We customize our IV vitamin drips with beneficial ingredients, which is a personalized service we take pride in. IV therapy may be applied to different health issues regarding brain health, muscle health, premature aging, chronic fatigue, cellular functioning, blood sugar levels, degenerative disease, energy levels, adrenal function, physical performance, mental performance, post-disease symptoms, and other concerns.

Our healthcare providers adhere to functional medicine, so we address patients as individual entities rather than groups of people. We can assist with symptom relief, while aiming to tackle the root cause of your health condition. Thus, genetics, past medical history, and environmental and lifestyle factors may be taken into consideration. Functional medicine testing is also available to establish mineral deficiencies, hormonal imbalances, heavy metal toxicities, and more.

How can we heighten your cellular metabolism, wound healing, and immune function? Let’s introduce you to our functional medicine programs to address your health triggers. Call (416) 968-6961 to book your complete diagnostic session for IV therapy in Toronto.

Disclaimer: The information in this article is designed for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for informed medical advice or care. This information should not be used to diagnose or treat any health problems or illnesses without consulting a doctor. Consult with a health care practitioner before relying on any information in this article or on this website.

 

References:

Gholamzadeh, Mehdi & Qasemzadeh, Mohammad. (2017). Zinc Sulfate: An Effective Micronutrient for Common Colds in Children: A Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Trial. Jundishapur Journal of Chronic Disease Care. In Press. 10.5812/jjcdc.55010.

Hou R, He Y, Yan G, Hou S, Xie Z, Liao C. Zinc enzymes in medicinal chemistry. Eur J Med Chem. 2021 Dec 15;226:113877. doi: 10.1016/j.ejmech.2021.113877. Epub 2021 Sep 30. PMID: 34624823.

Maxfield L, Shukla S, Crane JS. Zinc Deficiency. [Updated 2022 May 8]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493231/

Rabinovich D, Smadi Y. Zinc. [Updated 2022 May 8]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK547698/

Rao G, Rowland K. PURLs: Zinc for the common cold–not if, but when. J Fam Pract. 2011 Nov;60(11):669-71. PMID: 22049349; PMCID: PMC3273967.

Smailhodzic D, van Asten F, Blom AM, Mohlin FC, den Hollander AI, van de Ven JP, van Huet RA, Groenewoud JM, Tian Y, Berendschot TT, Lechanteur YT, Fauser S, de Bruijn C, Daha MR, van der Wilt GJ, Hoyng CB, Klevering BJ. Zinc supplementation inhibits complement activation in age-related macular degeneration. PLoS One. 2014 Nov 13;9(11):e112682. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112682. PMID: 25393287; PMCID: PMC4231060.

Tolino E, Skroza N, Mambrin A, Proietti I, Bernardini N, Balduzzi V, Marchesiello A, Di Fraia M, Michelini S, Potenza C. An Open-label Study Comparing Oral Zinc to Lymecycline in the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2021 May;14(5):56-58. Epub 2021 May 1. PMID: 34188751; PMCID: PMC8211333.

Zinc” from Oregon State University, originally written in 2001 by: Jane Higdon, Ph.D., Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Reviewed in May 2019 by: Emily Ho, Ph.D., Endowed Director, Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health Professor, School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, Principal Investigator, Linus Pauling Institute Oregon State University, viewed on October 17, 2022.

Zinc Health Sheet for Health Professionals”, National Institutes for Health, updated September 28, 2022, viewed on October 16, 2022.

Zinc Supplements: Benefits, Dosage, and Side Effects” from Healthline, By Rachael Link, MS, RD — Medically reviewed by Grant Tinsley, Ph.D., CSCS,*D, CISSN, Nutrition — Updated on January 18, 2022, viewed on October 16, 2022.